Google Chrome on Android starts communicating with your nearby devices

Google Chrome on Android starts communicating with your nearby devices

Google has announced that it has integrated the open-source Physical Web into its Chrome app on Android to let you start communicating with the nearby devices. The integration was debuted on the iOS version of the web browser in July last year and was initially developed for Mozilla’s Firefox OS.

With the Physical Web, Chrome version 49 allows you to wirelessly control some of the connected devices around location. There are Physical Web-enabled Bluetooth beacons that enable connectivity through the Web.

Google says that 1,500 beacons were deployed at the Consumers Electronics Show last month to help attendees navigate showrooms. Likewise, most of the smart parking meters in the US have some similar beacons to let you pay your parking charges directly through your mobile device.

Google Chrome Android Physical Web support

Google Chrome on Android now communicates with the Physical Web-powered devices

“Now, Physical Web developers can reach Chrome for Android users as well, starting with the Beta channel and rolling out more widely soon,” Physical Web Voyager Ani Mohan writes in a blog post.

You’ll receive a push notification on your Android device when you walk by a beacon for the first time. This notification helps you enable the Physical Web access on your Chrome and then lets you communicate with the nearby devices. The web browser saves previously used beacons to offer you an even easy access for the next time. Also, you can view a list of nearby beacons following the first time successful attempt by tapping the notifications on your device.

Chrome Android update

Google Chrome provides push notification when you walk by a beacon

The addition of the Physical Web is already available on the iOS counterpart. It means that you can use either your Android smartphone or an iPhone to start interacting with some of the smart devices in your surroundings.

Although the technology is presently just a concept for many developing regions like India and China, it has currently been tested in the US. It is likely to be expanded and extended in the coming future. Moreover, it could become widely available in our surroundings with the growth of Internet of Things (IoT) and connected devices.

“Now, Physical Web developers can reach Chrome for Android users as well, starting with the Beta channel and rolling out more widely soon,” Mohan concludes.

If you’re a developer, you could use the Eddystone-URL frame type to broadcast your URL. You’ll just need to install the latest Chrome beta to test your development.

Categories: Updates